Andrew Gillum’s Medicaid Expansion Would Skyrocket Taxes and Hurt Floridians

Andrew Gillum wants to expand Medicaid coverage under the Obamacare to 700,000 additional able-bodied, childless adults. He believes that federal taxpayers should foot the bill, but conveniently leaves out the estimates showing that, when the federal match rate drops to 90% in 2020, Floridians—not the federal government—would be paying $564 million per year in additional taxes by 2022. He ignores the fact that states that have expanded Medicaid coverage under ACA saw costs skyrocket 62% higher than expected.

Ron DeSantis understands that Medicaid is meant for the most impoverished or vulnerable members of our society, not able-bodied adults with no children, who could be contributing to Florida’s workforce. Ron knows that the best way to expand health care coverage for Floridians is not by taxing all Floridians more, on top of what they already pay for their health care, but by expanding our economy, creating new jobs, and investing in education so that everyone has access to high-paying jobs and employer coverage. For those who choose to purchase insurance on the market, Ron will support policies that encourage private-sector market competition and transparent pricing, allowing Floridians to have the freedom to choose affordable plans that match their health care needs.

Andrew Gillum’s impractical Medicaid expansion would cost our state more than we can afford, massively increasing costs and raising taxes. His tax and spend approach to governance will leave Floridians with less money in their pockets and fewer health care choices for themselves and their families.

Andrew Gillum is Calls Healthcare a “Fundamental Right,” Supports Expanding Medicaid Coverage Under the Affordable Care Act. “Most Democrats are calling for expanding Medicaid eligibility under the federal Affordable Care Act to include uninsured childless adults with incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level…Gillum, the mayor of Tallahassee, calls health care a ‘fundamental right’ and proposes extending Medicaid coverage to 700,000 lower-income state residents, which would make Florida the 39th state to expand Medicaid.” (John Haughey, “To expand or not to expand Medicaid? Polar party-line views factor in Florida elections,” Watchdog.org, 9/14/2018).

Federal Government Would Cover 90% of the Almost $5 Billion Cost of Expanding Medicaid. “Under the Affordable Care Act provision that allows states to expand Medicaid, the federal government would cover 90 percent of the approximately $5 billion cost of the expansion.” (Kirby Wilson and Elizabeth Koh, “Medicare for All? Even Medicaid expansion is unlikely, Florida Legislature says,” Tampa Bay Times, 9/13/2018).

Expanding Medicaid Coverage Under the Affordable Care Act Would Cost Florida an Additional $266 Million in Additional Taxes, and Would Increase to $564 Million in 2022. “Candidate Gillum alternatively proposes to expand Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (i.e., ACA or Obamacare), which would have added $4.83 billion in state spending last year, according to Florida’s Office of Economic and Demographic Research (EDR), including $266 million increase in state tax costs. The federal match rate will drop each year until it reaches 90 percent in 2020, increasing state costs to $564 million in FY 2022-23.” (Dr. J. Antonio Vilamil & Donna Arduin, “Election 2018: Platforms, Proposals, Projections,” The James Madison Institute, 10/15/2018).

Medicaid Expansion Was Far Costlier Than Initial CBO Projections. “Both higher-than-expected enrollment and spending per enrollee has resulted in the Medicaid expansion being much costlier than projected. For example, the CBO also projected in its April 2014 report that the Medicaid expansion would cost $42 billion in 2015. The actual cost was approximately $68 billion, about 62 percent higher.” (Dr. J. Antonio Vilamil & Donna Arduin, “Election 2018: Platforms, Proposals, Projections,” The James Madison Institute, 10/15/2018).

Ron DeSantis Opposes Medicaid Expansion, States that Taxpayers Should Finance Healthcare for “Childless, Able-Bodied Adults.” “DeSantis, a three-term Congressman who resigned from the U.S. House last week to focus on the gubernatorial election, voted repeatedly to repeal Obamacare and opposes Medicaid expansion. During campaign speeches, DeSantis maintains he does not think ‘childless, able-bodied adults’ should be eligible for Medicaid.” (John Haughey, “To expand or not to expand Medicaid? Polar party-line views factor in Florida elections,” Watchdog.org, 9/14/2018).

Ron DeSantis on Medicaid: Wasn’t Intended for Able-Bodied Adults. “The program, which pays for health care for the poor, elderly and those with complex medical needs, wasn’t intended for able-bodied adults who would get coverage under expansion, he said.” (Gray Rohrer, “Ron DeSantis, Andrew Gillum split on health care as reforms stall in Legislature, Congress,” Orlando Sentinel, 9/15/2018).

Ron DeSantis Supports Policies to Lower Healthcare Prices and Increase Competition in the Healthcare Marketplace. “DeSantis also indicated he would back proposals to install direct primary care models, in which patients pay a monthly rate directly to doctors and cut out insurers. He said he would expand telemedicine and ease regulations for building new hospitals. Such policies would add private-sector competition and lower prices, he argues.” (Gray Rohrer, “Ron DeSantis, Andrew Gillum split on health care as reforms stall in Legislature, Congress,” Orlando Sentinel, 9/15/2018).

There is No Legislative Support for Gillum’s Plan to Expand Medicaid. “‘I do not believe there is support in the Legislature for the expansion of Medicaid contemplated in the Affordable Care Act,’ incoming Senate President Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton said in a Wednesday statement to the Times/Herald…Jason Brodeur, who chairs the Florida House Health Care Appropriations subcommittee, said he also doesn’t expect his chamber to vote to expand the program. ‘That issue is settled,’ Brodeur said in an interview, ‘Unless (Gillum) has plans to overtake the House and the Senate and get them all to vote opposite of what we did a few months ago.’” (Kirby Wilson and Elizabeth Koh, “Medicare for All? Even Medicaid expansion is unlikely, Florida Legislature says,” Tampa Bay Times, 9/13/2018).

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2018-10-22T00:11:39+00:00 October 22nd, 2018|